John Muir Way

So the John Muir Way has been open since the 21st of April, this long distance route is a Coast to Coast route between Helensburgh in the West from where John Muir setoff to the United States where he inspired the conservation movement and the creation of it’s national parks. To Dunbar on the East Coast where he was born and grew up.

We’ve covered most of the route in OpenStreetMap for while. But until recently we’ve had a tiny, gap missing. I was trying to figure out getting over to do it when I saw:

So with some not insignificant effort, we now have the complete route mapped, these can easily be seen by looking at a raw view of either the walking route or the cycling route on OpenStreetMap, but where OSM comes into it’s own is the ability to actually do things with the data, so to kick things off I’ve created a set of GPX files of the route.

These contain the full walking or cycling route and are suitable to be loaded into your GPS or phone app as aids to navigating the route.

Map wise, as always I’m disapointed to see the otherwise very nice John Muir Way website using google maps rather than an OpenStreetMap based map, originally I had planned on just displaying the GPX overlaid onto a standard baselayer. But I then realised that Andy Allan’s fantastic Outdoor Layer already shows the walking route, and rather than obscuring the path or road underneath with a fat line like on the “offical” maps his style shows if the route is following a path or a road which is a huge improvement. Have a look below (if you’re reading this via a feed you’ll need to look at the original article to see the map)

There are also tools such as Relation Analyser Interestingly this shows cycling distance as 206km and the walking distance as 213km while the route is offically 215 km (I guess they rounded up) as well as length of different route types, so I can see that 7% of the cycling route is following primary roads, and 36% dedicated cycleways!

As always this wouldn’t be possible without the hard work of the hundereds of OpenStreetMap contributors who have mapped all the roads, trails, paths and cycleways that make up the routes, so as always a huge thank you to all of them.

Android Apps for Mapping

So with a mapping party coming at the weekend. I thought that it was about time that I start this series of posts that I’ve been planning for a while, so hopefully here is part 1 Android applications for collecting data.

 Tracking, OSM Tracker

One of the key apps, is something that can track where you are, providing a record of where you’ve been and allowing you to upload it to the OpenStreetMap website. OSM’s heritage is built around collecting data using a GPS, and it still remains a powerfull way of mapping an area without requiring other sources. And we actually are all carrying a GPS device around with us in our pocket it is very easy to do.

I use OSM Tracker it’s a simple app, and does it well, as well as recording a GPS trail, it also allows you to take pictures, and display the track on a map.

Use is really simple, start a new track:

Once it is running, it displays the currently GPS Position, shortcuts for taking a picture, and noting various features:

It is also possible to view the track on a map, this is really useful for checking the current area mapped, and seeing where you’ve been:

Finally, it’s possible to tag save and upload the track:

Editing, Vespucci

Editing is generally done as after mapping on a computer, but it can be really helpful to be able to make some changes from your phone, especially once you’re more experienced, I would recommend using Vespucci, Vespucci is getting better and better all the time, and does a really good job editing using the touch interface. This isn’t necessary a beginners tool, but a good tool that continues to improve that’s definitly worth looking at.

When you click on the map, it allows you to choose what item you wish to edit, which is a good solution to the problem of never being able to select accurately enough with your finger. Geometries can then we tweaked as neccessary.

Although I tend to use it to make small changes such as editing tags rather than big edits, it’s a powerfull tool that only gets better.

Data Gathering

Accessibilty, Wheelmap

Wheelmap is a great example of a simple data gathering app. The wheelchair app collects accessibilty information as well as some simple addressing information to be displayed on the Wheelmap Site

Addressing, Keypadmapper

As we have mapped a significant proportion of the road network, there is now a big push to collect addressing data Keypadmapper is a simple app to collect addressing data as you move down the road simply enter the numbers as you pass them. Later the address points can be loaded into JOSM for adding into OpenStreetMap.

So a quick summary of the apps:

Please let me know what I’ve missed in the comments below!

Switch to Octopress

So almost as often as I post, I rewrite the site. This time I have switched it to Octopress. This is the 3rd blogging engine, I’ve used

Serendipity SiteSerendipity Site Wordpress SiteWordpress Site Octopress SiteOctopress Site

I don’t get enough hits to justify the performance need of a static site, but it has the advantage of being one less wordpress site to maintain, and for me writting posts using markdown in vim is a definite win.

I have also taken the oportunity to switch to a small cluster I’ve setup using ByteMark’s BigV

Also a change, the code for this site is all on github. The commit history provides a nice history of the work and changes I’ve made to the standard Octopress site. This is largely in area’s of the category handling, and removing the banner. I may base some future posts on this.

OSM Talk for Esk Valley Rotary Club

OpenStreetMap: An Introduction; Rotary Club of Esk Valley, 15 January 2012

I had the plesure of doing a talk for the Rotary Club of Esk Valley this Tuesday, the talk was based on the talk I gave at SoTM Scotland,  with some of the more detailed information removed and some more introductory material added. So this posting is to cover some of the new stuff I covered or at least meant to cover.

I started with an introduction to OpenStreetMap briefly touching on the licencing terms and then lot of examples, such as cyclestreets for cycle planning, foursquare, ski maps, and not forgetting the Gaelic Map.

I then moved on to talk about HOT’s Humanitarian Work, borrowing lots of material from a previous HOT presentation.

After some talk about quality and contributors, I showed how to create an account and some slides on starting to use potlatch. I moved on to talk about phone apps. The full list for Android and iOS on the OSM wiki is quite intimidating so I wanted to give some specific suggestions to help get people started.

wheelmap.org screenshot

Simplest of all and working on both platforms is wheelmap.orgWhich provides a really simple interface to allow users to add accessibility information to existing places in OSM.

Pushpin App Screenshot

To add or edit POI’s on iOS there really is a simple choice, Pushpin a really nice simple well though out interface. Vespucci Screenshot

On Android, I recommend  Vespucci, it’s not as simple as pushpin but does allow a lot more to be edited on the go.

For more advanced mapping users may want to collect tracks. For Android I had lots of apps to choose from:

OSM Tracker App

and I would recommend OSMtracker, it collects the GPS track and also allows some POI’s to be noted on the go.

OSM4iPhone Screenshot

The choice was much more limited on iOS and in the end I couldn’t quickly find a free app, so I find myself recommending OSMTrack which costs a mere 69p as is ideal as it can upload directly into OSM as well as supporting offline data.

and that was it, I had already talked far too long and so it was time to finsh up and go to questions.

We had some good questions, about using OSM for teaching, one of the users had already installed wheelmap and was adding information.

Someone also asked if we had Kevock Road, so I took a deep breath and entered it into the search box.

and I was very happy to find the road was there and we had lots of details around it.

A big thanks to the Club for inviting me out and being such a good audience.

State of the Map Scotland 2013 - the State of Scotland

Once again, this year, I had the pleasure of presenting the opening at our now, not so little State of the Map Scotland Conference, which was held at Inspace on the 19th and 20th October 2012.

The State of Scotland 2012, State of the Map Scotland, Edinburgh, @chrisfl, #sotmscot

When I started to write this talk, I wasn’t sure where it was going to end up, I found it interesting and I hope that you do to.

For me one of the most exciting trends, over the last year is seeing OpenStreetMap appearing invarious places:

2012 started as the year of switch2osm

(photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/xerones/131963343/)

the switch2osm, 2012 started with an announcement by nestoria that they were moving over OSM.

nestoria website

Triggered  by the ever improving quality of OSM, as well as google looking at charging, it was great to see this long term support switch to using our map.

Another example is is foursquare. 

foursquare website

I was amazed when I opened the site at the prominence given to the map on the foursquare homepage. This shouldn’t be a surprise, given the nature of the site but I don’t think  a google map would have  made the landing page here.

It was also interesting to watch the foursquare community, I think overall OSM has gained visibility and exposure from this change (citation needed)

Flickr has  continued to have some OSM maps and improve those maps, despite a new deal yahoo has to switch to Nokia maps, has continued to have some OSM maps. 

iflickr map, showing Beijing

I would love to see  OSM as a layer across flickr’s maps, the Nokia maps are a big improvement but are still aimed at car drivers and so still miss lots of places where photo’s might be taken. Hopefully we will see  more OSM on flickr in the future.

Finally as a more personal example of a switch2osm. I switched my parents B&B in Kent  over to use OSM.

B&B at Bull Farm Oast, map page

This change was a little overdue, but for me is a milestone on my journey with OSM, I first discovered OpenStreetMap when I was trying to locate local attractions when I first added a google map to this site, back around 2006.

Sissinghurst Castle information page.

I wasn’t surprised by the detail on the Sissinghurst page, as I mapped this myself.

Bodiam Castle information page

but in fact zoomed in, almost every page such as this one for Bodiam Castle has lots of the little bits of detail, such as the moat, ticket office and car park (not shown here).

A lot of this is now possible, because more and more companies are starting to provide services around OSM. As I said last year:

OSM Database Server

Rightly or wrongly OSM is currently setup largely as a data provider - so it’s really great to see these other “consumer” facing options and websites appear as the more people see OSM the better our data becomes even if only a ting percentage of these can be converted into mappers. Obviously better information and simpler tools may help to lower the entry barrier in the future.

The biggest recent impact has been from mapbox:

Mapbox website

Also a big shout out to the Stamen map styles and tiles:

Black and White map of Glasgow Center

such as the toner style above or the acclaimed watercolour style that I used on the first slide.

While we’re on styles, we can’t ignore the continuous improvement’s to the OSM “house” style:

OpenStreetMap - showing Aberdeen

The cycle map style:

OpenStreetMap, cyclemap style, low zoom showing lots of scotland]

public transport style: OSM Website, public transport style, centered on Glasgow.]

and mapquest style Openstreetmap website, showing mapquest style centered on Glasgow]

again mapquest open provides a great example of a complete web mapping site, with search and routing. So provides a potential OSM powered  google maps replacement.

So What about the streets

So last year we did a comparison between the OS Locator dataset and OSM using the ITO Analysis tool, by region. I’ve added this years data into the table.

Place 2012 OS Locator 2012 “Missing” 2012 Roads 11 to 12 change
  position          
Edinburgh 4 4,760 4784 0 9 100 -> 99.81
Midlothian 6 1,180 1193 0 9 100 -> 99.25
Clackmannanshire 1 817 819 5 0 99.27 -> 100
South Lanarkshire 5 5432 5491 73 34 98.55 -> 99.38
West Dunbartonshire 9 1,233 1236 18 15 98.54 -> 98.79
Shetland Islands 8 309 311 6 3 98.06 -> 99.04
Stirling 12 1,361 1370 29 37 97.58 -> 97.30
East Ayrshire 16 2039 2052 50 64 97.50 -> 96.83
Glasgow City 1 6758 6761 171 0 97.44 -> 100%
West Lothian 15 2030 2038 48 59 97.44 -> 96.96%
Inverclyde 13 1239 1240 32 34 97.42 -> 97.26%
Na H Eileanan An Iar 10 298 297 5 4 97.32 -> 98.98%
East Lothian 11 1343 1353 33 32 97.10 -> 97.19%
North Ayrshire 14 2180 2189 63 63 97.06 -> 98.08%
Dundee City 20 2223 2229 65 76 97.03 -> 96.55%
Angus 18 1877 1878 57 59 96.91 -> 96.81
South Ayrshire 22 1803 1809 61 69 96.45 -> 96.08
Argyll And Bute 21 1400 1403 50 48 96.43 -> 96.58
Monmouthshire 17 1529 1538 52 48 96.34 -> 96.81
Fife 23 5607 5627 217 228 95.93 -> 95.75
Scottish Borders 24 1890 1902 78 79 95.77 -> 95.74
East Renfrewshire 27 1323 1328 57 60 95.62 -> 95.41
Aberdeen City 1 2772 2774 125 0 95.27 -> 100
Highland 28 3443 3483 535 388 84.05 -> 88.46
Aberdeenshire 25 3886 3936 626 167 83.63 -> 95.73
Renfrewshire 26 2447 1378 430 60 82.18 -> 95.41
Perth and Kinross 19 2409 2424 478 79 79.91 -> 96.45
Dumfries And Galloway 7 2556 2580 586 22 76.53 -> 99.15
Moray 29 1545 1581 366 226 75.92 -> 85.45

The first thing that struck me as that in both Edinburgh and Midlothian the total number of roads has increased, but we’ve missed some so we’re not longer at 100%.

There have been some fantastic, improvements Glasgow was missing 171 roads last year and these have been accounted for. Dumfries And Galloway was bottom of the list last year and it’s now in 7th, as has Aberdeen City.

There are also some places such as Na H Eileanan An Iar; also known as the Outer Hebredies which are looking quite static.

So what does that all add up to?

2011, 4316 Roads Missing from OSM Compared to OS, Scotland was 93% Complete. In 2012, 1972 Roads Missing. Scotland 95% Complete

In 2011, we  were shown as having 4316 Roads that hadn’t been accounted for, so 93% match.

When I looked a few days ago, we only  don’t align on 1972 missing roads, or a 95% match.

So what are these missing streets? I started by looking at the 9 roads highlighted in Edinburgh.

ITO Analysis Map, showing missing new estate road names,

The first stop are these Roads in Kirkliston, we seem to have one of these roads, but are missing the name, the other two roads are shown in OSM as under construction as below.

OSM Map showing "missing streets" as roads under contruction.

So the conclusion is probably a draw on this one, it looks like neither OS Locator or OSM have the full picture, but a visit is needed.

The next example is around Edinburgh Airport

ITO Analysis Map, OSM shows Almond Avenue and OSM shows Almond Drive

OSM Shows Almond Avenue, but OS Locator Almond drive. A visit here will need to take place to confirm who is right.

ITO Map, showing missing road

Again it looks like some new houses here have led to some new developments that we don’t yet have.

ITO Map, showing new estate

This one was quite simple the Lane and the footpath should be joined, so I fixed this myself.

ITO Map

I think that this one is a new development, that needs visiting.

ITO Map

Again this one in Newhaven is probably a new development, that needs visiting.

Interestingly in the few days since I gave this presentation, some of these have been fixed, by changes such as this one: “Added missing street names from ITO in Kirkliston” and this “Added initial layout of new housing development in Newburgh, Edinburgh.”. I really hope that these were done with local knowledge especially as adding the through road through Kirkliston doesn’t looks like the kind of road layout that would be permitted as it would allow a rat run through a residential area.

Anyway, we have evidence that OS Locator data can’t always be relied upon.

How accurate is OS data? In Edinburgh 2.2% of names don't match, in Glasgow 1.4% of names don't match. Worst case in the UK, in King's Lynn and West Norfolkm 7.4% don't match.

Already in Edinburgh 2.2% of roads in Edinburgh do not match what OS Locator shows.

Glasgow, 1.4 % and looking at one of the other places at 100%, Kings’s Lynn shows 7.4% out. This is really a warning, we should be using this as a datasource to help us know where to map, but this data cannot be relied upon.

Something else was causing me concern, and that was in the Outer Hebrides.

How are we doing in Remote Places, like the Outer Hebrides

It also helps that I’ve holidayed and mapped here (or should it be the other way round) and so have lots of photos :)

There weren’t many changes in 2011 of 298 roads we were missing 5 and in 2012 the total roads is 297 and we’re missing 4.

So first thing, I thought that I would look at the last modification data of a selection of the objects:

2006, 971, 2007: 10499, 2008: 2967, 2009: 7015, 2010: 61878, 2011: 8698, 2012: 26600

This wasn’t quite what I expected, so  far this year there has been a lot of activity.

And so I thought I would break down into months:

So the basic level is quite small, but with a big peak in June and July.

Looking in detail at June I saw, most of the changes:

we’re made by a single user, brianboru. I was very happy to see that he had been there and  and some of the information is surveyed on the ground with lots of detailed tracing of terrain, helping to fill in the map, so I thought I would see what else this user was up to?

So he’s from Birmingham, and by the looks of things he like I holidayed and did a ton of mapping and tracing whilse on holiday.

But once I ignored the holiday based tracing binges, there is a steady background work by seumas, and looking at his page, I was again very pleased to see that he does live on the Island.

and busy doing some mapping of shops, pubs, chippies and some paths:

This was really for me the Golden Road, to be honest I didn’t expect to find a local mapper living on the edge of the country, but here he is.

So how much data do we have:

Cat - WHAT DO WE HAVE?

Overall the breakdown over Scotland is:

1.2G of XML, 5 847 127 Nodes, 483 990 Ways, 5086 Relation Compared to before the license change, 5 206 480 Nodes, 451 091 Ways, 4844 Relations

]he uncompressed XML weighs in at 1.2G on disk, consisting of nearly 6 million nodes, nearly 500 000 ways and 5000 relations.

I also ran this against a dump from before the licence change, and we have grown significantly since then, by over 600 000 nodes, and  30 000 ways. So we are well above the numbers from before the change, and thanks to the hard work of the community in Scotland to get local mappers on board and also to mitigate against loss I don’t think we had any big problems.

What’s in a name?

36 660 named nodes and 134 724 named ways

We have 36 660 named nodes and 134 724 named ways.

Place?

6807 Names Places

6807 of these are places, from Cities down to Hamlets and localities.

So how long are the ways:

The table above lists the top 20 way types by length.

The total, motorway length in OSM shows as 827km compares well with the total motorway length in wikipedia (once I remembered that OSM will have ways for both directions)

We have 4 226km of paths, I suspefct there are a lot more in Scotland.

We’re up to 1 645 km of cycleway, and additionally cycling is permitted on a further 1000km of footways and paths.

We have 53 km of steps, I wouldn’t want to climb those all at once.

There is also the longtail of the list:

Somewhere we have 30m of broken bridge (not the one pictured), 10 km of racing track and 1 099m of train platforms.

all made possible by OSM’s flexable tagging system:

and the 1776 users who have contributed!

List of *all* contributors in Scotland

Last year I asked the question.

How do we extend the community?

I still don’t think we have a really good answer to that question, but whatever we do, we must Tell People.

Tell people, OSM is not like fight club, Tell your sister mother brother, Tell your friends and enemies, Show everyone you meet, Go out your way to tell strangers

It’s the only way of improving the map.

Thank you. Follow me @chrisfl on twitter or @OSMScotland

State of the Map Scotland 2012 - the State of Scotland

Once again, this year, I had the pleasure of presenting the opening at our now, not so little State of the Map Scotland Conference, which was held at Inspace on the 19th and 20th October 2012.

The State of Scotland 2012, State of the Map Scotland, Edinburgh, @chrisfl, #sotmscot

When I started to write this talk, I wasn’t sure where it was going to end up, I found it interesting and I hope that you do to.

For me one of the most exciting trends, over the last year is seeing OpenStreetMap appearing invarious places:

2012 started as the year of switch2osm

(photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/xerones/131963343/)

the switch2osm, 2012 started with an announcement by nestoria that they were moving over OSM.

nestoria website

Triggered  by the ever improving quality of OSM, as well as google looking at charging, it was great to see this long term support switch to using our map.

Another example is is foursquare. 

foursquare website

I was amazed when I opened the site at the prominence given to the map on the foursquare homepage. This shouldn’t be a surprise, given the nature of the site but I don’t think  a google map would have  made the landing page here.

It was also interesting to watch the foursquare community, I think overall OSM has gained visibility and exposure from this change (citation needed)

Flickr has  continued to have some OSM maps and improve those maps, despite a new deal yahoo has to switch to Nokia maps, has continued to have some OSM maps. 

iflickr map, showing Beijing

I would love to see  OSM as a layer across flickr’s maps, the Nokia maps are a big improvement but are still aimed at car drivers and so still miss lots of places where photo’s might be taken. Hopefully we will see  more OSM on flickr in the future.

Finally as a more personal example of a switch2osm. I switched my parents B&B in Kent  over to use OSM.

B&B at Bull Farm Oast, map page

This change was a little overdue, but for me is a milestone on my journey with OSM, I first discovered OpenStreetMap when I was trying to locate local attractions when I first added a google map to this site, back around 2006.

Sissinghurst Castle information page.

I wasn’t surprised by the detail on the Sissinghurst page, as I mapped this myself.

Bodiam Castle information page

but in fact zoomed in, almost every page such as this one for Bodiam Castle has lots of the little bits of detail, such as the moat, ticket office and car park (not shown here).

A lot of this is now possible, because more and more companies are starting to provide services around OSM. As I said last year:

OSM Database Server

Rightly or wrongly OSM is currently setup largely as a data provider - so it’s really great to see these other “consumer” facing options and websites appear as the more people see OSM the better our data becomes even if only a ting percentage of these can be converted into mappers. Obviously better information and simpler tools may help to lower the entry barrier in the future.

The biggest recent impact has been from mapbox:

Mapbox website

Also a big shout out to the Stamen map styles and tiles:

Black and White map of Glasgow Center

such as the toner style above or the acclaimed watercolour style that I used on the first slide.

While we’re on styles, we can’t ignore the continuous improvement’s to the OSM “house” style:

OpenStreetMap - showing Aberdeen

The cycle map style:

OpenStreetMap, cyclemap style, low zoom showing lots of scotland]

public transport style: OSM Website, public transport style, centered on Glasgow.]

and mapquest style Openstreetmap website, showing mapquest style centered on Glasgow]

again mapquest open provides a great example of a complete web mapping site, with search and routing. So provides a potential OSM powered  google maps replacement.

So What about the streets

So last year we did a comparison between the OS Locator dataset and OSM using the ITO Analysis tool, by region. I’ve added this years data into the table.

Place 2012 OS Locator 2012 “Missing” 2012 Roads 11 to 12 change
  position          
Edinburgh 4 4,760 4784 0 9 100 -> 99.81
Midlothian 6 1,180 1193 0 9 100 -> 99.25
Clackmannanshire 1 817 819 5 0 99.27 -> 100
South Lanarkshire 5 5432 5491 73 34 98.55 -> 99.38
West Dunbartonshire 9 1,233 1236 18 15 98.54 -> 98.79
Shetland Islands 8 309 311 6 3 98.06 -> 99.04
Stirling 12 1,361 1370 29 37 97.58 -> 97.30
East Ayrshire 16 2039 2052 50 64 97.50 -> 96.83
Glasgow City 1 6758 6761 171 0 97.44 -> 100%
West Lothian 15 2030 2038 48 59 97.44 -> 96.96%
Inverclyde 13 1239 1240 32 34 97.42 -> 97.26%
Na H Eileanan An Iar 10 298 297 5 4 97.32 -> 98.98%
East Lothian 11 1343 1353 33 32 97.10 -> 97.19%
North Ayrshire 14 2180 2189 63 63 97.06 -> 98.08%
Dundee City 20 2223 2229 65 76 97.03 -> 96.55%
Angus 18 1877 1878 57 59 96.91 -> 96.81
South Ayrshire 22 1803 1809 61 69 96.45 -> 96.08
Argyll And Bute 21 1400 1403 50 48 96.43 -> 96.58
Monmouthshire 17 1529 1538 52 48 96.34 -> 96.81
Fife 23 5607 5627 217 228 95.93 -> 95.75
Scottish Borders 24 1890 1902 78 79 95.77 -> 95.74
East Renfrewshire 27 1323 1328 57 60 95.62 -> 95.41
Aberdeen City 1 2772 2774 125 0 95.27 -> 100
Highland 28 3443 3483 535 388 84.05 -> 88.46
Aberdeenshire 25 3886 3936 626 167 83.63 -> 95.73
Renfrewshire 26 2447 1378 430 60 82.18 -> 95.41
Perth and Kinross 19 2409 2424 478 79 79.91 -> 96.45
Dumfries And Galloway 7 2556 2580 586 22 76.53 -> 99.15
Moray 29 1545 1581 366 226 75.92 -> 85.45

The first thing that struck me as that in both Edinburgh and Midlothian the total number of roads has increased, but we’ve missed some so we’re not longer at 100%.

There have been some fantastic, improvements Glasgow was missing 171 roads last year and these have been accounted for. Dumfries And Galloway was bottom of the list last year and it’s now in 7th, as has Aberdeen City.

There are also some places such as Na H Eileanan An Iar; also known as the Outer Hebredies which are looking quite static.

So what does that all add up to?

2011, 4316 Roads Missing from OSM Compared to OS, Scotland was 93% Complete. In 2012, 1972 Roads Missing. Scotland 95% Complete

In 2011, we  were shown as having 4316 Roads that hadn’t been accounted for, so 93% match.

When I looked a few days ago, we only  don’t align on 1972 missing roads, or a 95% match.

So what are these missing streets? I started by looking at the 9 roads highlighted in Edinburgh.

ITO Analysis Map, showing missing new estate road names,

The first stop are these Roads in Kirkliston, we seem to have one of these roads, but are missing the name, the other two roads are shown in OSM as under construction as below.

OSM Map showing "missing streets" as roads under contruction.

So the conclusion is probably a draw on this one, it looks like neither OS Locator or OSM have the full picture, but a visit is needed.

The next example is around Edinburgh Airport

ITO Analysis Map, OSM shows Almond Avenue and OSM shows Almond Drive

OSM Shows Almond Avenue, but OS Locator Almond drive. A visit here will need to take place to confirm who is right.

ITO Map, showing missing road

Again it looks like some new houses here have led to some new developments that we don’t yet have.

ITO Map, showing new estate

This one was quite simple the Lane and the footpath should be joined, so I fixed this myself.

ITO Map

I think that this one is a new development, that needs visiting.

ITO Map

Again this one in Newhaven is probably a new development, that needs visiting.

Interestingly in the few days since I gave this presentation, some of these have been fixed, by changes such as this one: “Added missing street names from ITO in Kirkliston” and this “Added initial layout of new housing development in Newburgh, Edinburgh.”. I really hope that these were done with local knowledge especially as adding the through road through Kirkliston doesn’t looks like the kind of road layout that would be permitted as it would allow a rat run through a residential area.

Anyway, we have evidence that OS Locator data can’t always be relied upon.

How accurate is OS data? In Edinburgh 2.2% of names don't match, in Glasgow 1.4% of names don't match. Worst case in the UK, in King's Lynn and West Norfolkm 7.4% don't match.

Already in Edinburgh 2.2% of roads in Edinburgh do not match what OS Locator shows.

Glasgow, 1.4 % and looking at one of the other places at 100%, Kings’s Lynn shows 7.4% out. This is really a warning, we should be using this as a datasource to help us know where to map, but this data cannot be relied upon.

Something else was causing me concern, and that was in the Outer Hebrides.

How are we doing in Remote Places, like the Outer Hebrides

It also helps that I’ve holidayed and mapped here (or should it be the other way round) and so have lots of photos :)

There weren’t many changes in 2011 of 298 roads we were missing 5 and in 2012 the total roads is 297 and we’re missing 4.

So first thing, I thought that I would look at the last modification data of a selection of the objects:

2006, 971, 2007: 10499, 2008: 2967, 2009: 7015, 2010: 61878, 2011: 8698, 2012: 26600

This wasn’t quite what I expected, so  far this year there has been a lot of activity.

And so I thought I would break down into months:

So the basic level is quite small, but with a big peak in June and July.

Looking in detail at June I saw, most of the changes:

we’re made by a single user, brianboru. I was very happy to see that he had been there and  and some of the information is surveyed on the ground with lots of detailed tracing of terrain, helping to fill in the map, so I thought I would see what else this user was up to?

So he’s from Birmingham, and by the looks of things he like I holidayed and did a ton of mapping and tracing whilse on holiday.

But once I ignored the holiday based tracing binges, there is a steady background work by seumas, and looking at his page, I was again very pleased to see that he does live on the Island.

and busy doing some mapping of shops, pubs, chippies and some paths:

This was really for me the Golden Road, to be honest I didn’t expect to find a local mapper living on the edge of the country, but here he is.

So how much data do we have:

Cat - WHAT DO WE HAVE?

Overall the breakdown over Scotland is:

1.2G of XML, 5 847 127 Nodes, 483 990 Ways, 5086 Relation Compared to before the license change, 5 206 480 Nodes, 451 091 Ways, 4844 Relations

]he uncompressed XML weighs in at 1.2G on disk, consisting of nearly 6 million nodes, nearly 500 000 ways and 5000 relations.

I also ran this against a dump from before the licence change, and we have grown significantly since then, by over 600 000 nodes, and  30 000 ways. So we are well above the numbers from before the change, and thanks to the hard work of the community in Scotland to get local mappers on board and also to mitigate against loss I don’t think we had any big problems.

What’s in a name?

36 660 named nodes and 134 724 named ways

We have 36 660 named nodes and 134 724 named ways.

Place?

6807 Names Places

6807 of these are places, from Cities down to Hamlets and localities.

So how long are the ways:

The table above lists the top 20 way types by length.

The total, motorway length in OSM shows as 827km compares well with the total motorway length in wikipedia (once I remembered that OSM will have ways for both directions)

We have 4 226km of paths, I suspefct there are a lot more in Scotland.

We’re up to 1 645 km of cycleway, and additionally cycling is permitted on a further 1000km of footways and paths.

We have 53 km of steps, I wouldn’t want to climb those all at once.

There is also the longtail of the list:

Somewhere we have 30m of broken bridge (not the one pictured), 10 km of racing track and 1 099m of train platforms.

all made possible by OSM’s flexable tagging system:

and the 1776 users who have contributed!

List of *all* contributors in Scotland

Last year I asked the question.

How do we extend the community?

I still don’t think we have a really good answer to that question, but whatever we do, we must Tell People.

Tell people, OSM is not like fight club, Tell your sister mother brother, Tell your friends and enemies, Show everyone you meet, Go out your way to tell strangers

It’s the only way of improving the map.

Thank you. Follow me @chrisfl on twitter or @OSMScotland

New Lanark Mapping Party

I’ve just finished my map updates from the New Lanark Mapping Party this weekend. I’m pretty sure that this has been the best attended of our mapping parties with more new people than old, I didn’t do a count but easily over 20.

New Lanark itself, is a World Heritage Site was originally founded in 1786 as Cotton Mills and Housing for the workers, it’s an early example of planned urban development and the business itself was run with consideration for the well being of the workers and lead the way in reform, socialism and welfare. But the wikipedia article covers this, and is well worth a read.

The area either side of the cycle is the Scottish Wildlife Trust’s Falls of Clyde a nature reserve

Map data © OpenStreetMap contributors, CC BY-SAMap data © OpenStreetMap contributors, CC BY-SA

The day started with a quick get together, where we choose our slices of the area to map, with Bob and Tim taking the new mappers around the village and because the mapping party was sponsored by The Central Scotland Green Network Community Fund  I picked a green area with other side of the Clyde, without quite realising how far it was to get to a bridge to cross….

This didn’t matter as the the morning’s rain cleared and the sun came out, the scenery was quite special.

Falls of Clyde.

Forest.

although parts of the area had been mapped in advance, there were lots of details to add:

SeatsPrivate Path.

as well as the obligatory danger signs:

DANGER!

and closed roads, which Dair - seen running out had already covered.

Road Closed.

In all we covered 11km of mostly footpaths, I was glad of the lack of tree cover at the moment which meant that I could vastly improve area’s such as this windy downhill:

and some more urban mapping:

House NumberStreet Sign

By the time we got back, we had missed lunch but it was good to see everyone busy processing the afternoon’s work:

Mapping.Mapping.Mapping.

SOTM Scotland Video’s Online

State of the Map Scotland - the State of Scotland

With the “Official” State of the Map Conference in Denver finishing over the weekend, I’m reminded that I’ve not yet put my talk from our little un-conference at the end of August up on, and as we have a social in Edinburgh this evening, I though that I had better do that. So here are my slides and a rough version of what I talked about, we had a mixed group so who were new to OpenStreetMap and also regular mappers; my plan was to try and put something in for both groups.

The talk started by thinking about what is OpenStreetMap…

OpenStreetMap creates and provides free geographic  data such as street maps to anyone who wants them. The project was started because most maps you think  of as free actually have legal or technical restrictions  on their use, holding back people from using them in  creative, productive, or unexpected ways.

So we have the Open data definition of OpenStreetMap, but what does it actually look like:

The OpenSteetMap Foundation The Map The Planet File The Website The Wiki Tools The Community  .????

So what does OpenStreetMap Look Like? What tangible and untangible things do we have?

Well like it or not OSM was formed on an open principle of licensing so lets start there….

CC-BY-SA

So we started with a CC-BY-SA license which is built on the principle that you are free to Share or Adapt, the work provided that you Attribute and Share Alike the resulting work. But there are problems with this for a database such as OSM’s so there has been a process to create the ODBL:

I’m not going to get into the nitty gritty now, and Dair is going to be talking about the advantages of ODBL over CC-BY-SA later. But the ongoing process is not without pain, but the end result will be a map that is much easier to actually use, and that what we’re about.

So is OSM about the MAP? We definitly have advantages over other maps, for example the A to Z might show:

![](/post-assets/2011-09-13-state-of-the-map-scotland-the-state-of-scotland/Slide07.jpg

A close where this is a row of houses as an Easter Egg.

Also our map can be much better than the alternatives: Take a look at one of the area’s I first mapped on Bing:

In google:

and on OSM:

As well as factual inaccuracies, such as Road naming, missing streets, and incorrect road geometries, there are also additional details such as cycle paths, foot paths, private roads, buildings, schools, parks, station platforms and steps on OSM.

We can also do more interesting things with maps, such as create our versions from the underlying data:

This is from my work in Progress for Edinburgh Festival Maps. Where I can choose what is displayed and what isn’t, for example the fringe venues show their festival names and are shown in blue.

And all this is possible because it’s a map we can Edit ourseleves.

and the data model is pretty simple, at the bottom we have nodes, on there own these can represent point objects. Such as cycle parking, traffic lights, bollards. There can be connected together to for ways. There might represent roads or building, boundaries, rivers anything that might be represented by a line or a closed area.

Less simple, we also have relations, these are collections or ways or nodes, and are used to represent more complex objects such as the courtyard in a building or cycle routes.

On top of these we have a flexible tagging scheme:

the tagging scheme is totally open, there are no rules enforced by the API or the database. This means that you are free to tag things however you want. But the community has a set of conventions that are documented on the wiki and generally these are adhered to. But the important thing here is when you find something new; there aren’t any committees deciding how to tag, you just do it.

So is OSM the hardware?

or the code?

I would say that it’s the community:

Not that kind of community…

This kind of community - this picture is from the Edinburgh Zoo mapping party where we mapped the zoo out:

](http://www.chrisfleming.org/osm/state-of-the-map-scotland-the-state-of-scotland/attachment/slide19/)

It’s the same community that meant that in November 2007, Edinburgh looked like:

and in August 2012:

and overall the numbers against the ITO analysis look pretty good:

Place OS Locator Roads Missing % Complete
Edinburgh 4,760 0 100
Midlothian 1,180 0 100
Clackmannanshire 817 5 99.27
South Lanarkshire 5432 73 98.55
West Dunbartonshire 1,233 18 98.54
Shetland Islands 309 6 98.06
Stirling 1,361 29 97.58
East Ayrshire 2039 50 97.5
Glasgow City 6758 171 97.44
West Lothian 2030 48 97.44
Inverclyde 1239 32 97.42
Na H Eileanan An Iar 298 5 97.32
East Lothian 1343 33 97.1
North Ayrshire 2180 63 97.06
Dundee City 2223 65 97.03
Angus 1877 57 96.91
South Ayrshire 1803 61 96.45
Argyll And Bute 1400 50 96.43
Monmouthshire 1529 52 96.34
Fife 5607 217 95.93
Scottish Borders 1890 78 95.77
East Renfrewshire 1323 57 95.62
Aberdeen City 2772 125 95.27
Highland 3443 535 84.05
Aberdeenshire 3886 626 83.63
Renfrewshire 2447 430 82.18
Perth and Kinross 2409 478 79.91
Dumfries And Galloway 2556 586 76.53
Moray 1545 366 75.92

Until we get too the bottom of the table… but the total is still something to be proud of.

According to the ITO analysis, we’re missing”4316 Roads compared to OS.

This means that Scotland is 93% “Complete” by this measure.

and when we are 100% complete on this measure there may be other measures to look at:

such as the meridian analysis, but we need to complete the map first. For now, and I don’t want to start a fight:

we’re going to do that by tracing:

Which is great, people can use the maps with confidence; and across the country we know we at very least meet the google maps standard, but for the OSM standard we really need to have people on the ground, and we have a problem, there was a study done into Who Maps in OpenStreetMap and Why?

This found that mappers are 96% Male and 78% have a degree and higher.

We also know that more people looking at area’s improved accuracy.

So for the best freshest map we need people on the ground, in Moray and Dumfries and across Scotland.

The OSM website shows 30 mappers within 1km of me in Edinburgh, yet we have huge area’s of Scotland with no one.

The big challenge for OSM in Scotland is to get people across the country looking after there street, town and village in Scotland adding the details and seeing what has changed.

Photo Credits